Marketing Encompasses More Than Digital Outreach; Don’t Neglect Other Outreach Vehicles

April 26, 2016

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With all the current emphasis on digital marketing, it can be easy to overlook other outreach avenues. And that can be a big mistake. Yes, it’s important to have a strong, cohesive online presence. (See my previous post An Online Presence is No Longer Enough for important elements of online marketing.) But – is this where the majority of your customers will find you?

Consider the following marketing vehicles:

  • Consumer press (online and print)
  • Trade press (online and print)
  • Press releases
  • Advertising in trade publications or local or national newspapers
  • BillboardsID-10093559
  • TV and radio advertising
  • Company magazines or newsletters
  • Company brochures
  • Events
  • Invitations
  • Postcards
  • Posters
  • Speeches
  • Mailings
  • Joining business or industry or local organizations
  • Networking events
  • Fundraising events – yours or other companies
  • Conferences
  • Product demonstrations
  • Classes
  • Word of mouth
  • Company shirts or hats or mugs

These are just the first ones that come to mind; you can probably think of more. Depending upon the size of your company, perform some analytics or do a simple survey to determine the best way to reach your customers. You also need to look at your demographics. Generally speaking, older customers are not online as much as younger customers. You might be surprised with what you find, and you might need to adjust your marketing strategy.

1st Image courtesy of everydayplus at FreeDigitalPhotos.net — 2nd Image courtesy of pat138241 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

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Tech Terms are Prevalent but Still Misunderstood

January 27, 2014

Every company and every industry has its own ubiquitous acronyms and terms, some of which cross over into other arenas. Information technology is one of the few industries that seeps or creeps into most, if not all, organizations regardless of industry, as well as into our personal lives. Fifteen years ago, I wrote a user manual for my colleagues, explaining new technology. Chapters included:

“What is the world wide web?”

“What is e-mail?”

“How to use e-mail.”

Of course at that time we all had analog mobile phones, which seemingly weighed about 5 pounds.

In the last five years or so, social media has become pervasive. During that time period, I spent countless hours defining social media, explaining its uses, and simplifying its purpose for both colleagues and friends. Texting (in the personal arena) and Twitter (in the personal and business arenas) have been the most confounding across the board. For example:

“What is texting? And why are all the kids using it?”

“I don’t get Twitter. It doesn’t make any sense.”

“I don’t like Twitter because I don’t want to be limited in how many words I can use.” (This one always makes me laugh. Most people would be surprised at how much you can convey using only a few words.)

Three or four years ago, I entered the world of SEO and SEM. At that time, these terms were fairly common, especially SEO, but only amongst the techies. The use of either of those terms outside of technology circles would prompt confused looks and raised eyebrows. No one else knew those acronyms stood for Search Engine Optimization and Search Engine Marketing, or even if they did hear or know the full terms, they weren’t the least bit interested.

Now, SEO and SEM are the new keywords; their mention becoming more and more prevalent in business marketing conversations. Business owners and executives know that these processes, if implemented correctly, can help grow their company. However, the use of SEO and SEM is much more complex than simply using keywords, counting views or click-throughs, or looking at your search engine ranking. Yes, all these elements are important to measure, but the latter two are merely basic indicators as to whether additional analysis, testing, and marketing is necessary.

In talking recently with marketing executives at a large national corporation about this topic, I was confused as to why we seemed to be in disagreement. Finally it dawned on me that they were talking basic SEO, as outlined above, while I was assuming they were well beyond that and I was talking about conversion rates and competitors. This illustrates that while these terms may be going mainstream, there still exists much confusion and misinformation.

I’m tracking this with enthusiasm to see where the trend takes us. As a professional communicator with a lifelong love of technology, I can’t wait to see what’s next.


How are you getting your message out?

March 6, 2011

As a professional communicator, I utilize differing dissemination vehicles, depending upon the company and the message. Vehicles include traditional means, like newsletters, press releases and ads, along with electronic methods. A good marketing communications plan analyzes all the possible dissemination methods and capitalizes on the ones that will best reach target audiences. Below is a short list of ways to communicate your message. What would you add to the list?

newsletter or magazine

press release

advertisement

media relationships – press coverage

community relationships

industry group memberships

web site

e-mail

e-zine

LinkedIn

Twitter

FaceBook

blog

word of mouth

public speaking

networking/one-on-one meetings

events


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